Advertisement

Early diagnosis of radiotherapy failure for patients with head and neck cancer: the role of biochemical markers

Abstract

Purpose

There is a lack of effective diagnostic tools for early assessment of radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). The timely diagnosis of treatment failure may facilitate use of salvage procedures to prevent disease progression. We assessed squamous cell carcinoma antigen and CYFRA 21-1 as early markers of radiotherapy failure in patients with HNC.

Methods

Between January 2009 and February 2012, 185 patients (median age 59 years) with squamous cell carcinoma were treated with curative intent with RT alone or combined with chemotherapy (ChT). Markers were estimated in the serum 2 times: before RT and after completion of treatment.

Results

The median of follow-up was 40 months. Locoregional control (LRC) was 53% and locoregional failure (LRF) was 31%. When comparing LRC and LRF, there were no significant differences between markers concentration obtained before RT. After RT, CYFRA 21-1 (p = 0.018) was significantly elevated in the LRF group. Patients with CYFRA 21-1 <1.79 ng/ mL had a higher disease-free survival rate compared to patients with CYFRA 21-1 ≥1.79 ng/mL (74% vs 53%, respectively). After RT, CYFRA 21-1 was significantly related to the overall survival ratio in both univariate (p = 0.049) and multivariate analysis (p = 0.019).

Conclusions

CYFRA 21-1 assessed at the end of RT or ChT seems to be a prognostic marker for tumor response. A high concentration of CYFRA 21-1 after treatment increases the risk of death. CYFRA 21-1 might be suggested in the monitoring of carcinomas of HNC.

Post author correction

Article Type: ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE

DOI:10.5301/tj.5000639

Authors

Jolanta Mrochem-Kwarciak, Tomasz Rutkowski, Andrzej Wygoda, Regina Deja, Agata Hajduk, Krzysztof Składowski

Article History

Disclosures

Financial support: No financial support was received for this submission.
Conflict of interest: None of the authors has conflict of interest with this submission.

This article is available as full text PDF.

  • If you are a Subscriber, please log in now.

  • Article price: Eur 36,00
  • You will be granted access to the article for 72 hours and you will be able to download any format (PDF or ePUB). The article will be available in your login area under "My PayPerView". You will need to register a new account (unless you already own an account with this journal), and you will be guided through our online shop. Online purchases are paid by Credit Card through PayPal.
  • If you are not a Subscriber you may:
  • Subscribe to this journal
  • Unlimited access to all our archives, 24 hour a day, every day of the week.

Authors

Affiliations

  • Analytics and Clinical Biochemistry Department, Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice, Silesia - Poland
  • I Radiation and Clinical Oncology Department, Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice, Silesia - Poland

Article usage statistics

The blue line displays unique views in the time frame indicated.
The yellow line displays unique downloads.
Views and downloads are counted only once per session.

No supplementary material is available for this article.